Steps to writing a book summary

If no author is given, use the title of the article: The main idea or argument needs to be included in this first sentence.

Steps to writing a book summary

It's easier than you think. The secret is to incorporate the 8 Basic Plot Elements. Starting with your story idea, you only need to make eight choices to ensure the plot of your future novel hangs together in a meaningful way.

Then let's get started. I'll describe each of the eight elements in turn.

Introduction to Book Reports

If you already have an idea for a novel you're working on, open your file or get a pad of paper or your writer's notebook. As you read through the rest of this page, jot down ideas for how each element might work in your story. At the end, I'll show you how to use your choices to create a brief, well-rounded plot outline for your novel.

If you don't have an idea for a novel yet, just grab one from your imagination. It doesn't have to be good.

How to Write Book Report: Easy Steps With Examples

It's just an exercise after all. On the other hand, if you already have a draft for a novel, that you're looking to revise, then ask yourself, as we go through these elements, whether you have included them in your story. Create a plot outline for your novel in the way suggested below.

You may find you can strengthen your novel plot considerably by incorporating any plot element you neglected before. Story Goal The first element to include in your plot outline is the Story Goal, which we covered in detail in the previous article, The Key to a Solid Plot: Choosing a Story Goal.

To summarize, the plot of any story is a sequence of events that revolve around an attempt to solve a problem or attain a goal. In this case, we might choose to make the Story Goal for her to find true love before it's too late.

There are many ways we could involve other characters in this goal.

steps to writing a book summary

For instance, we could give our protagonist Forcing the protagonist to work out whether her friend's experience really applies to her — or whether it was just a case of choosing the wrong partner, or bad luck.

We could even make the company where the protagonist works in danger of failing because it doesn't appreciate the importance of family. It could be losing good employees to other companies that do.

In other words, after we have chosen a Story Goal, we will build a world around our protagonist that includes many perspectives on the problem and makes the goal important to everyone in that world.

That's why choosing the Story Goal is the most important first step in building a plot outline. If you haven't chosen a goal for your novel yet, do so now.

Make a list of potential goals that fits the idea you are working on. Then choose choose one goal to base your plot outline on. The Consequence is the negative situation or event that will result if the Goal is not achieved. Avoiding the Consequence justifies the effort required in pursuing the Story Goal, both to the characters in your novel and the reader, and that makes it an important part of your plot outline.

The combination of goal and consequence creates the main dramatic tension in your plot. It's a carrot and stick approach that makes the plot meaningful. In some stories, the protagonist may begin by deciding to resolve a problem or pursue a goal. Later, that goal becomes more meaningful when he discovers that a terrible consequence will occur if he fails.

As Melanie Anne Phillips points out, in some stories the consequence seems to be in effect when the story opens.

Perhaps the evil despot is already on the throne and the Story Goal is to depose him. In that case, the consequence, if the protagonist fails, is that things will stay the way they are. In our novel plot about the female executive, we've already come up with one possible Consequence — that she could end up like her spinster aunt.

We could make the Consequence worse perhaps the aunt dies of starvation because she is feeble and has no immediate family looking after her. Or we could create a different Consequence. Her employer may go bankrupt unless it becomes more family-friendly.

Academics: Writing Assignments

Write a list of possible Consequences you could have in your plot outline. Then choose one to be the counterpoint to your chosen Story Goal. Requirements The third element of your plot outline, Requirements, describes what must be accomplished in order to achieve the goal.Oct 27,  · How to Write a Book Summary.

In this Article: Article Summary Sample Book Summaries Taking Notes Drafting and Editing the Summary Reading Carefully Community Q&A Writing a summary of a book is a great way for you to absorb what you’re reading.

It also gives you a quick reference you can use to remember the main points of the book anytime you need it%(). How to Teach Summary Writing–The 1-Hand Summary: My goal with this was to have it work for anything Maddy chose–a news article, a magazine article, anything.

Consequence

And for the most part, it works. Writing an effective book report can be a challenging assignment for many students because it requires that you should analyze a large amount of information in comparatively small space, discuss the writer’s main themes, the plot of the story, and characters from an objective stance.

5 Steps of Writing a Book Summary. Book summaries, while considerably not the most difficult assignment in the writing world, may take home the medal for most annoying. How to Write a Book Report College Level. In college, most students find themselves tasked with writing a book report.

The steps for writing a book report require formatting, book summary, and providing an evaluation of the text. pfmlures.com 1 Steps by the Big Book TABLE OF CONTENTS THE 12 STEPS OF ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS 2 INTRODUCTION 3.

How Does One Write a Chapter Summary? | pfmlures.com